Regenerative Sciences
Regenerative Sciences Seminar: Neutrophil Recruitment Patterns and the Effector Function in Inflamed Intestinal Mucosa

Please join us on Thursday, January 17th, for the next presentation in the 2018-19 Regenerative Sciences Seminar Series (RS3).  Dr. Ronen Sumagin, PhD, Assistant Professor, in the Department of Pathology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, will present a talk entitled “Neutrophil recruitment patterns and the effector function in inflamed intestinal mucosa”.  The seminar will begin at 12:30 in Lecture Hall North, 4th floor of the College of Dentistry, 801 S. Paulina St.   A light lunch will be served at 12:15PM.

Please save the dates for upcoming 2019 RS3 presentations:   Feb. 14, April 18 & May 16. 

 

Neutrophil Recruitment Patterns and the Effector Function in Inflamed Intestinal Mucosa

Ronen-Sumagin.jpgDr. Ronen Sumagin, PhD, Assistant Professor
Department of Pathology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University

In the case of bacterial infection and mucosal injury neutrophil transepithelial migration is essential for host defense and tissue homeostasis, however, it may also lead to detrimental inflammation, which is a hallmark of inflammatory disorders of mucosal surfaces, particularly diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including ulcerative colitis and Cohn’s disease. Our laboratory focuses on interactions of innate immune cells, specifically neutrophils with luminally expressed epithelial adhesive receptors, and the contribution of these interactions to regulation of epithelial barrier and mucosal wound healing, under the conditions of intestinal inflammation. A better understanding of the mechanisms regulating PMN recruitment and retention at the mucosal surfaces, and identification of specific molecules that may link PMN-epithelial cell interactions with epithelial barrier function and wound repair are imperative for the development of new and improved therapeutic approaches aiding in the resolution of mucosal inflammation, and reestablishing epithelial homeostasis.

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UIC is a Leader in Regenerative Sciences Research

Moving beyond tissue replacement, using materials to enable our bodies to regenerate damaged and failing tissues.

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We are leading investigations into how materials interact with living tissues, and the building of tissue replacements for the growth of cells/tissues to replace lost tissues. The Center for Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration (CWHTR) is a unique community of scientists and clinicians devoted to the study of injury, wound healing, and regeneration. The Laboratory of Applied Dental Biomaterials and Interfaces is a NIH funded center studying the properties of the tooth in order to develop reparative/regenerative biomaterials to replace lost tooth structure.

 

Research at the UIC College of Dentistry

Our investigators lead cutting-edge research to discover and translate new knowledge at the boundaries of science, transforming oral health care practice, social systems and related technologies for the benefit of individuals, families and communities.

 Craniofacial Pathobiology
Working to improve treatment of oral cancer, caries, peridontal and other oral diseases. 

Regenerative Science
Moving beyond tissue replacement, using materials to enable our bodies to regenerate damaged and failing tissues.

Clinical, Translational & Community
Leading transformative studies to improve oral health outcomes both in the clinic and the community. 

 

Date:
January 17, 2019
Time:
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Location:
UIC College of Dentistry
801 S. Paulina St.

Chicago , IL 60612
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