• January 1, 2017
UIC College of Dentistry oral medicine oral cancer screening

Men are less likely than women to take care of their physical health and, according to surveys and studies, their oral health is equally ignored. Good oral health recently has been linked with longevity. Yet, one of the most common factors associated with infrequent dental checkups is just being male. Men are less likely than women to seek preventive dental care and often neglect their oral health for years, visiting a dentist only when a problem arises. When it comes to oral health, statistics show that the average man brushes his teeth 1.9 times a day and will lose 5.4 teeth by age 72. If he smokes, he can plan on losing 12 teeth by age 72. Men are also more likely to develop oral and throat cancer and periodontal (gum) disease.

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Article Provided By:
Academy of General Dentistry
KnowYourTeeth.com

 

 

Why is periodontal disease a problem?

bigstock-Section-of-the-tooth-pulp-wit-92196569.jpgPeriodontal disease is a result of plaque, which hardens into a rough, porous substance called tartar. The acids produced and released by bacteria found in tartar irritate gums. These acids cause the breakdown of fibers that anchor the gums tightly to the teeth, creating periodontal pockets that fill with even more bacteria. Researchers have found a connection between gum disease and cardiovascular disease, which can place people at risk for heart attacks and strokes. See your dentist if you have any of these symptoms:

  • Bleeding gums during brushing
  • Red, swollen or tender gums
  • Persistent bad breath
  • Loose or separating teeth

 

Do you take medications?

Since men are more likely to suffer from heart attacks, they also are more likely to be on medications that can cause dry mouth. If you take medication for the heart or blood pressure, or if you take antidepressants, your salivary flow could be inhibited, increasing the risk for cavities. Saliva helps to reduce the cavity-causing bacteria found in your mouth.

 

Do you use tobacco?

If you smoke or chew, you have a greater risk for gum disease and oral cancer. Men are affected twice as often as women, and 95 percent of oral cancers occur in those over 40 years of age.

 

The most frequent oral cancer sites are the tongue, the floor of the mouth, soft palate tissues in back of the tongue, lips and gums. If not diagnosed and treated in its early stages, oral cancer can spread, leading to chronic pain, loss of function, irreparable facial and oral disfigurement following surgery and even death. More than 8,000 people die each year from oral and pharyngeal diseases. If you use tobacco, it is important to see a dentist frequently for cleanings and to ensure your mouth remains healthy. Your general dentist can perform a thorough screening for oral cancer.

 

Do you play sports?

If you participate in sports, you have a greater potential for trauma to your mouth and teeth. If you play contact sports, such as football, soccer, basketball and even baseball, it is important to use a mouthguard, which is a flexible appliance made of plastic that protects teeth from trauma. If you ride bicycles or motorcycles, wear a helmet.

 

Taking care of your teeth

StudentDentistry1_0.JPGTo take better care of your oral health, it is important to floss daily, brush your teeth with fluoride toothpaste twice daily and visit your dentist at least twice a year for cleanings. Here are some tips to better dental health:

  • Use a soft-bristled toothbrush to reach every surface of each tooth. If the bristles on your toothbrush are bent or frayed, buy a new one.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three months or after you've been sick.
  • Choose a toothpaste with fluoride. This can reduce tooth decay by as much as 40 percent.
  • Brush properly. To clean the outside surfaces of your teeth, position the brush at a 45-degree angle where your gums and teeth meet. Gently move the brush in a circular motion using short, gentle strokes. To clean the inside surfaces of the upper and lower front teeth, hold the brush vertically. Make several gentle strokes over each tooth and its surrounding gum tissue. Spend at least three minutes brushing.
  • Floss properly. Gently insert floss between teeth using a back-and-forth motion. Do not force the floss or snap it into place. Curve the floss into a C-shape against one tooth and then the other.

 

 

Oral  health services at the University of Illinois at Chicago 

Comprehensive, Personalized Oral Care for All Needs, All in One Place

The College of Dentistry offers all dental specialty care practices – all in one place. We have over 280 faculty and residents in general dentistry  advanced specialties including EndodonticsOral MedicineOral and Maxillofacial SurgeryOrthodonticsPediatric DentistryPeriodontics and Prosthodontics. Many of our faculty also provide care through a Faculty Practice, as well as teach in the college. Also, many of our faculty serve as researchers who lead scientific investigations that advance the methods used in our clinics.

All College of Dentistry patients have the advantage of highly personalized treatment and the choice of getting their care from a student dentist, a resident specialist, or faculty specialist. Either way, we offer patients one-on-one attention, and the best treatment plan to match your needs, and your schedule – for the best overall value.

 

For new appointments call (312) 996-7555 or contact a specific service/clinic area.

General Family Dentistry

Preventive care for the whole family to maintain good oral health including exams, cleaning, fillings, x-rays, crowns, bridges, dentures, and root canal treatments

 

Endodontics

Advanced root canal therapy and related services using state-of-the-art equipment and techniques.

 

 

Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery

Facial and jaw reconstructive surgery, implants, bone grafting, sinus lift procedures, skeletal deformities, craniofacial anomalies, facial traumatic injuries, TMJ disorders, head and neck cancer microneurosurgery, obstructive sleep apnea, facial aesthetic surgery, dental and facial infections.

 

Oral Medicine

Specialized expertise in the diagnosis and non-surgical treatment of oral lesions, oral cancer, bad breath, and infectious diseases affecting the mouth.

 

 

Orthodontics

Comprehensive treatment of bite problems, misaligned teeth and jaws, and jaw growth problems for children and adults. We offer Invisalign and SureSmile.

 

Pediatric Dentistry

A wide range of oral health services for children from infancy through adolescence including those with special and complex oral health needs, and patients with special developmental and behavioral care needs.

 

 

Periodontal Therapy

Non-surgical treatments, gum graft surgery, regenerative procedures, dental crown lengthening, dental implants, pocket reduction.

 

 

Prosthodontics

Specialists in the complete restoration of teeth and smile, with a commitment to both functionality and appearance. Restorative treatments from single tooth decay repair, crowns and implants to the most complex reconstructions and full mouth implant prosthesis using the latest technology.

 

 

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